North Law Legal Collectibles

North Law Publishers proudly offers for sale this very fine selection of rare books, artwork, one-of-a-kind items and other law memorabilia. Each would make a precious addition to your office or an unforgettable gift. All items offer exceptional value and may be returned in the condition received within 30 days of receipt for a full refund.

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The Common Law

Holmes, Oliver Wendell, Jr.  [1841-1935]. The Common Law. Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1881.

Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. is universally acknowledged to be one of the most influential judges in the history of the Supreme Court. Serving on the Court from 1902 to 1932, he was known for his succinct explanations, his often-terse opinions and his disagreement with the views of his Court colleagues.  Holmes was the son of prominent writer and physician, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. and abolitionist Amelia Lee Jackson. He loved literature and was a staunch supporter of the abolitionist movement.

After serving in the Civil War, he attended Harvard Law School and was admitted to the bar in 1866. He settled into practicing admiralty law in Boston, and became an editor of the American Law Review.

In 1881, he published "The Common Law," a compilation of lectures given at the Lowell Institute in Boston. Many consider this to be the only significant volume of American jurisprudence written by a practicing attorney.  Cited by Grolier, 100 American, 84: "This brilliant exposition, as effective on English scholarship and legal thinking as on American, of the true nature of law both as a development from the past and an organism of the present, blew fresh air into lawyers' minds encrusted with Blackstone and Kent." It offers an historic perspective of liability, criminal law, torts, bail, possession and ownership, contracts, successions, as well as many other aspects of civil and criminal law.

Condition/Description: First Edition, boards, very good or better copy of a scarce title. First Issue with the two-line printer's imprint on title page verso repeated with ampersand on page 422. Original purple cloth. With the bookplate of Charles Robinson Smith on the front pastedown as well as the bookseller's ticket of L. K. Strouse & Co. Typical aging of paper; neat binder's tape reinforcement of front hinge. Rubbing to top of spine with some wear and the heel of the spine with slight loss of lettering of publisher's name.


$2426.00 (price includes shipping)
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ballads

ballads

Ballads en Termes de la Ley (Originally Written for the Use of the Trinity Lawyers) and Other Verses.

Anson, Sir William Reynell [1843-1914]. [Raper, R.W., Editor]. "Ballads en Termes de la Ley (Originally Written for the Use of the Trinity Lawyers) and Other Verses." Oxford: Printed for Private Circulation by Horace Hart, 1914. [i], 57 pp. Portrait frontispiece with overlay, ribbon marker.

Educated at Eton and Balliol College, Oxford, William Reynell Anson (1843-1914), took a first class in the final classical schools in 1866, and was elected to a fellowship of All Souls in the following year. He was called to the bar in 1869, and went the home circuit for four years, when he succeeded to the baronetcy. In 1874, he became Vinerian reader in English law at Oxford, a post that he held until 1881, when he was appointed the warden of All Souls College. He became an alderman of the city of Oxford in 1892, chairman of quarter sessions for the county in 1894, vice-chancellor of the university in 1898-1899 and named chancellor of the diocese of Oxford in 1899. In that year he was returned, without opposition, as MP for Oxford University in the Liberal Unionist interest, and consequently resigned the vice-chancellorship. In Parliament, he preserved an active interest in education, being a member of the newly created consultative committee of the Board of Education in 1900, and in 1902 he became Parliamentary Secretary to the Board of Education, a post he held until 1905.

Condition/Description: Three-quarter pebbled calf over cloth, gilt titles to front board and spine, top edge gilt. Light rubbing to extremities with minor wear, some wear to edges and corners. Early owner signature to front free endpaper, interior otherwise clean. This volume contains a printed dedication leaf annotated and inscribed by Anson's sisters. It was published posthumously as a memento and includes "The Ballad of Negotiable Instruments" and "The Ballad of Subsequent Impossibility."

 


$324.00 (price includes shipping)
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blackstone

Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England, Eller 26

This rare 1803 four volume edition of Blackstone's Commentaries would make an extraordinary edition to any legal library.

Blackstone, Sir William [1723-1780]. Christian, Sir Edward [d. 1823],
(Editor). Commentaries on the Laws of England, in four books. With the
Last Corrections of the Author: And with Notes and Additions.
London: Printed by A. Strahan for T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1803.

Sir William Blackstone was a professor and an English jurist whose
"Commentaries on the Laws of England," first published in four volumes
in 1765-1789, brought him great fame and fortune. The work is based on
a series of lectures he gave at Oxford. Little did he know, that his thoughts
and ideas would "dominate the common law legal system for more than a
century." So popular was this material, that an American edition was published between 1771-1772, and sold out its first printing of 1,400 immediately. A second edition was soon to follow. Even today, these volumes remain an important and highly respected source of information on the views of the common law and its principles.

Description/Condition:
Copperplate frontispiece portrait, table of consanguinity, folding
table of descents. Contemporary calf, blind fillets to boards,
rebacked, raised bands, lettering pieces and elaborate blind-stamped
tooling to spines, endpapers renewed. Moderate rubbing to extremities,
minor chipping to heads of spines, a few small scuffs to boards,
corners bumped and worn. A few cracks to text blocks of Volumes 3 and
4. Later owner signature scratched out from each front pastedown.
Negligible foxing in a few places, interior otherwise fresh.
Fourteenth edition. Paging irregular, following Blackstone's paging
in margin. "Since the publication of the thirteenth edition, 1800,
Christian had become Chief Justice of the Isle of Ely, and the Downing
professor of the laws of England in the University of Cambridge. These
titles appear on title pages of this fourteenth edition, in which his
notes are printed as footnotes." Cited by Eller, The William Blackstone
Collection in the Yale Law Library 26.


$1915.00 (price includes shipping)
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Sir Alexander Cockburn – Lord Chief Justice Print, 1870

This antique print was produced by well-known French artist Faustin Betbeder, who relocated to England, where he owned a printing business and contributed illustrations to the London Figaro. The subject of this particular work, Sir Alexander Cockburn, "served in the House of Commons, as attorney general (1851–56), and as chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas (1856–59), before being appointed to the Queen's Bench (1859–74)."* He became lord chief justice of England in 1874, a position he held for six years. He is most widely known for his tests of obscenity and insanity. According to Cockburn, "to be obscene, the material in question had to be proved to ‘deprave and corrupt’ those exposed to it, and to be insane, a criminal defendant had to be proved unwitting of the 'nature and quality' of his criminal act or incapable of recognizing it as wrong."*
*Encyclopedia Britannica Concise

 

Condition/description
This print is in good condition.

Size:  5" x 8" with a small plain margin around the image making the actual sheet slightly larger


$149.00 (price includes shipping)
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Court of Justice Aquatint (1840s)

This aquatint depicts, Dr. Syntax, a character developed by English caricaturist, Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827), who produced a series of works describing the travels of his fictional creation across Regency England. Born in London, Rowlandson was the son of a tradesman and became a student at the Royal Academy. His designs, including this one, were usually executed as an outline with a reed pen and were washed with color.  They were then etched on copper and later aquatinted. Rowlandson’s work dealt with the "various aspects and incidents of social life" during the time. However, he also produced a series of erotic prints that would be considered pornographic today.

Condition/description
This print is in good condition.

Size:  8" x 5" with a small, plain margin around the image, making the actual sheet slightly larger.


$325.00 (price includes shipping)
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Series of Vanity Fair Antique Prints, 1910

These four original antique prints were part of a series of over 100 prints first published by the English Vanity Fair magazine in 1902 at a size of 10.5" x 15.5." Eight years later, they were reprinted at this smaller size.
Vanity Fair magazine began publication in 1868 and was a British Weekly. Its publication spanned over the Victorian and Edwardian eras and offered readers articles on a broad array of topics including: "fashion, current events, reviews of the theatre, new books, reports on social events and the latest scandals, mixed together with serial fiction, word games and other trivia."
The magazine was founded by Thomas Gibson Bowles, who wrote a great deal of the content himself. Other well-known editorial contributors included Lewis Carroll and William Wilde. It publication is, however, best known for its caricatures, which number more than 2,000. Among the many gifted artists whose works grace its pages, three in particular - Sir Leslie Ward, Sir Max Beerbohm and Carlo Pellegrini - are recognized as some of the finest caricaturists in the business. Ward, known as "Spy," satirized the social life of the middle and upper classes; Beerbohm specialized in social and literary figures; and Pelligrini, also know as "Ape," produced the first color lithograph to appear in the magazine - a caricature of Benjamin Disraeli published in 1869. The last issue of the magazine was printed on February 5, 1914.

(From left to right)

Print 1: Hon. Sir Alfred Wills (Spy)
Print 2: Hon. Sir James Stirling
Print 3: Hon. Sir Joseph Walton
Print 4: Hon. The Earl of Halsbury (Spy)

Size: 7" x 5" each

Condition/description: These original prints are in generally good condition and are ready for framing. The caricatures of Alfred Wills and Earl of Halsbury both include the signature "Spy."


$450.00 (price includes shipping)
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Unframed "A Civil Action" Movie Poster, 1998

John Travolta and Robert Duvall star in this 1998 film that is based on an actual case, (Anderson v. Cryovac), which took place in Woburn, Massachusetts during the 1980s. Travolta's character, Jan Schlichtmann, is an attorney who agrees to represent families whose children have succumbed to leukemia after two large corporations leaked toxic chemicals into the town's water supply. The case will be difficult and costly to prove and could ultimately lead to his personal and professional ruin, yet he decides to pursue. Robert Duvall was nominated for an Academy Award for his portrayal of Schlichtmann's legal opponent, Jerome Facher, an old-school attorney, whose corporate clients rely on him to get them "off the hook" at any cost, and whose brazen remarks pepper the film with cynicism. "The truth?" he scoffs, "I thought we were talking about a court of law. Come on, you've been around long enough to know that a courtroom isn't a place to look for the truth,"

Condition/description: This original poster is in mint condition and is ready for framing. A buttoned-down John Travolta looks confidently out of this moody duotone print that is accented with chiseled gold type.

Size: 27" x 41"


$45.00 (price includes shipping)
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Unframed "Wall Street" Movie Poster, 1987

"Every dream has a price" was the tagline for this blockbuster film about Wall Street greed, that ironically, was released just two months after the October 1987 melt down of the stock market. While thousands of real-life financial hot shots and millions of investors licked their wounds from the virtual collapse of the world markets, Michael Douglas delivered an unforgettable, Academy Award-winning performance as Gordon Gekko, a ruthless corporate raider, who takes a young impatient stockbroker, Bud Fox (Charlie Sheen), under his wing, and literally teaches him the "tricks of the trade." The movie offers a very realistic portrayal of the "do anything for a dollar" mentality that prevailed during the height of the 1980s bull market.

Condition/description: This original poster, in mint condition, is ready for framing. The lead characters peering out of the stark blackness of the background, and the beautifully rendered depiction of the New York City skyline, make it a strikingly bold decorative statement for an office, media center or den.

Size: 27" x 41"


$135.00 (price includes shipping)
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Unframed "The Devil's Advocate" Movie Poster, 1997

Based on a novel written by Andrew Neiderman, "The Devil's Advocate," starring Keanu Reeves and Al Pacino, tells the story of an undefeated Florida defense attorney, Kevin Lomax, who is recruited by a New York law firm. Little does he know that his boss and mentor, John Milton, is actually the devil himself. The film's title is a reference to the common phrase "devil's advocate," someone who takes a position for the sake of argument. The term was originated by the Roman Catholic Church, and was used during the canonization process, when the devil's advocate, a canon lawyer, was appointed by the Church to argue against the canonization of a candidate for sainthood and to scrutinize any miracles attributed to him or her. Al Pacino's character, John Milton, has the same name as the author of "Paradise Lost," the 17th-century epic poem. The film features some of this literary masterpiece's most famous quotations including: "Better to reign in Hell, than serve in Heaven."

Condition/description: original/mint-condition. Its rich red and black tones provide a dramatic decorative accent for an office or media room.

Size: 27" x 37.5"


$45.00 (price includes shipping)
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lincoln

Unframed "Al Capone" Movie Poster, 1959

The tagline and marketing copy for this movie say it all. "His True Shocking Story...Filmed with Bullet Force! It was the age of speakeasies and jazz... when everybody sinned, ginned and broke the laws... while a vicious crime lord almost took over the nation!
Rod Steiger starred in this 1959, black and white film that captures the very essence of roaring-twenties Chicago. Rather than glorifying the mobster, he plays him as "a monster whose psychopathy seems somehow disturbingly human." He may be vulgar and violent, but he always aspires to be something better. Many critics felt this movie was almost a documentary, rather than an entertainment piece. The film won the 1959 Golden Laurel Award for "sleeper of the year."

Condition/description: This poster is in very good condition. It is linen backed. The bright yellow background; the cocky depiction of a cigar-smoking Capone; and the bold red type, make it a wonderful piece for a large entranceway or lobby. There are evenly distributed crease marks across the poster from previous folding.

Size: 81" x 81"


$2,000.00 (price includes shipping)
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Unframed "Judgment at Nuremberg" Movie Poster, 1961

Written by Abby Mann and directed by Stanley Kramer, "Judgment at Nuremberg," boasts an all-star cast that includes: Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster, Richard Widmark, Marlene Dietrich, Maximilian Schell, Judy Garland and Montgomery Clift. A young William Shatner offers a strong supporting performance, just five years prior to accepting the role as Captain Kirk that would catapult him to stardom.

Winner of two Academy Awards, the film tells the story of an American judge, during the infamous Nuremberg trials, who is faced with the issue of deciding how much guilt and responsibility an individual must bear for crimes that were condoned by the government or committed under its direct orders. The movie is based on true events that occurred during World War II and contains disturbing footage of the German concentration camps.

Condition/description: This piece features stylized treatment of the characters' faces which are posterized against a black background, punctuated by swaths of red and gold type. It is linen backed and in very good condition.

Size: 81" x 81"



$2,000.00 (price includes shipping)
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lincoln

Unframed "The Verdict" Movie Poster, 1982

"The Verdict," an Academy Award-nominated feature film starring Paul
Newman, Jack Warden, James Mason and Charlotte Rampling, tells the story of Frank Galvin, an alcoholic attorney, who takes on a medical malpractice case to improve his own standing, but who ends up becoming deeply engrossed in doing the "right thing." Based on a novel by Barry Reed and directed by Sidney Lumet, the poster reflects the muted, often ponderous tones of the film. Punchy advertising copy makes this an inspirational piece for any attorney's office or study: "Frank Galvin Has One Last Chance At A Big Case. The doctors want to settle, the Church wants to settle, the lawyers want to settle, and even his own clients are desperate to settle. But Galvin is determined to defy them all. He will try the case."

Condition/description: This original poster is reproduced on high-quality stock and is ready for framing.

Size: 27" x 37.5"



$45.00 (price includes shipping)
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Article I: Congress
(Susan Loy Calligraphy)

We found Susan Loy and her extraordinary calligraphy at the Woodstock Crafts Fair over the summer and immediately fell in love with the first two pieces in her "Constitution Project" - "The Preamble" and "Article I: Congress." These magnificent prints - each one signed by the artist - are beautifully matted and framed and show off her exceptional talents. You will be absolutely amazed at the meticulous detail and beauty of these art works - they definitely generate a "wow" factor in any office and make a memorable gift for a special friend or colleague.

Ms. Loy labored over this - the larger of the two pieces -- for more than 500 hours, lettering its 2293 words onto 102 lines. Using color changes in the letterforms, she created a glowing landscape in the backdrop of her drawing of the Capitol Building. A square border in blue and red made up of the names of the fifty states and a large circle in black and brown made up of the words, "We the People", "The General Welfare", "Justice", and "Liberty" surround the words to Article I.

Signed prints from an original watercolor painting. Print Image Size: 15-1/2" x 15-1/2" Frame Size: 23' x 23'


$199 custom matted and wood-framed (postage included)
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lincoln

The Preamble
(Susan Loy Calligraphy)

We found Susan Loy and her extraordinary calligraphy at the Woodstock Crafts Fair over the summer and immediately fell in love with the first two pieces in her "Constitution Project" - "The Preamble" and "Article I: Congress." These magnificent prints - each one signed by the artist - are beautifully matted and framed and show off her exceptional talents. You will be absolutely amazed at the meticulous detail and beauty of these art works - they definitely generate a "wow" factor in any office and make a memorable gift for a special friend or colleague.

Ms. Loy has recast the Preamble in a striking geometric design in brown and black, and of course, red, white, and blue. The opening phrase, "We the People," is at the center of the painting surrounded by interlocking graphics representing "liberty," "justice," and "tranquility." This piece mounts intriguingly on the diagonal.

Signed prints from an original watercolor painting. Print Image Size: 9-1/2 x 9-1/2 Frame size: 24" x 24" on the diagonal.


$119 custom matted and wood-framed (postage included)
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Rare Complete Set of Satirical French Legal Postcards, 1904

This complete set of six French legal postcards, published in 1904 is a rare find -- none are addressed. All bear a cancelled French stamp and the words: "SAVIGNY-S-ORGE FEVR 4, 04 SEINE ET OISE."

Each card depicts a young girl dressed as an attorney, complete with hat and robe. The first card in the series carries the heading/title: Emouvante Plaidoirie ("Making a Motion").

The captions follow from one card to the next, telling a story:
1) Messieurs de la Cour, Messieurs les Jures. ("Members of the Court, Members of the Jury.")

2) Je jure de dire la verite, toute la verite, rien que la verite. ("I swear to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.")

3) Je sais que mon client est un voleur, un escroc, soit! peut-etre meme son ceuvre sera-t-elle regardee comme la plus grande escroquerie du siecle. ("I know that my client is a thief, a swindler! -- Perhaps his work will even be regarded as the greatest swindle of the century.")

4) Mais est-ce sa faute a lui s'il n'avait pas le gout du travail, car que demandait-il apres tout: de ne rien faire, que bien boire, bien manger, bien dormir, et pour cela il recherchait les bonnes poires! ("But is it his fault that he is out of work, for that is all he asks, after all: nothing more than something good to drink, good food, a good place to sleep, and for that it looked for the good pears!")

5) J'ai sous les yeux sa maniere de proceder qui est simple et facile et je demande au Tribunal de la faire admettre dans les cours de compatabilite de l'Etat, vu les resultats merveilleux qu'elle donne! ("I have before me his manner of proceeding which is simple and easy and I ask the Court to admit in the proceeding the compatibility of the State, seeing the wonderful results that she gives!")

6) Et en terminant je conclus que mon client a droit a l'indulgence due Tribunal, car apres tout, il aurait pu tuer son beau-frere, sa belle-mere, sa concierge ... il ne l'a pas fait, donc ca denote une bonne nature; en consequence je demande au Tribunal d'acquitter simplement mon illustre client. ("And, to sum up, I conclude that my client has the right to the Court's indulgence for, after all, he could have killed his fine brother, his lovely mother, his office manager... but, he did not do so, therefore this denotes a good heart; in consequence, I request the Court to simply acquit my illustrious client.")

Condition/description: The cards are in good condition and have been placed in a simple protective frame, however, they may be re-framed to suit the buyer's taste.

Size: 
Unframed: 3.5" x  5  3/8
Framed:  16.25"  x  20.5"


$459.00 (price includes shipping)
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"I Dreamed I Swayed the Jury in My Maidenform Bra"
Advertisement, 1963

This kitschy, black and white full-page magazine advertisement is so politically incorrect by today’s standards that it is sure to get a laugh from either sex. According to the Maidenform Web site, "The Dream campaign ran from 1949 through 1969 and revolutionized intimate apparel advertising by featuring women in their bras acting out fantasies of independence in public places." During the 1950s and 1960, "the Dream campaign that had appealed to the women that stayed at home during the War was changed to appeal to the woman entering the work force." Other tag lines included: "I dreamed I went shopping in my Maidenform bra," "I dreamed I stopped traffic in my Maidenform bra," "I dreamed I barged down the Nile in my Maidenform bra." These ads were widely published, but appeared predominantly in women's magazines including
Ladies Home Journal.

Condition/Description: The paper is somewhat fragile but in good condition overall.
For protective purposes, the ad has been placed in a plexiglass frame, however, it can be matted and framed to suit the buyer’s tastes.

Size: 10 ½" x 14".


$209.00 (price includes shipping)
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Framed "The Devil's Advocate" Movie Poster, 1997

Based on a novel written by Andrew Neiderman, "The Devil's Advocate," starring Keanu Reeves and Al Pacino, tells the story of an undefeated Florida defense attorney, Kevin Lomax, who is recruited by a New York law firm. Little does he know that his boss and mentor, John Milton, is actually the devil himself. The film's title is a reference to the common phrase "devil's advocate," someone who takes a position for the sake of argument. The term was originated by the Roman Catholic Church, and was used during the canonization process, when the devil's advocate, a canon lawyer, was appointed by the Church to argue against the canonization of a candidate for sainthood and to scrutinize any miracles attributed to him or her. Al Pacino's character, John Milton, has the same name as the author of "Paradise Lost," the 17th-century epic poem. The film features some of this literary masterpiece's most famous quotations including: "Better to reign in Hell, than serve in Heaven."

Condition/description: This original, mint-condition poster, smartly presented in a black metallic frame and mounted under glass, is reproduced on high-quality stock. Its rich red and black tones provide a dramatic decorative accent for an office or media room.

Size: 27" x 37.5"


$169.00 (price includes shipping)
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Framed "The Trial of Billy Jack" Advertisement, 1974

"The Trial of Billy Jack" picks up where "Billy Jack" leaves off. It was the third movie in a series of four, written by Tom Laughlin, who also starred as the lead character. Surprisingly, this movie broke every box office record of its time. It also changed the way in which motion pictures were distributed. Mr. Laughlin was the first writer/director to use national TV advertising to promote a film. His wife Delores Taylor, who played the part of Jean Roberts, helped to write the script. The movie cost $800,000 to make and grossed over $65 million.

In the "Trial of Billy Jack" the half-white, half-Indian karate expert is convicted of involuntary manslaughter, goes to jail for a few years, and returns to the Freedom School.

The film, like many made in the "psychedelic" 70s, explores many issues of the day including: finding inner peace, bigotry, government corruption and Indian rights.

Published in "Rolling Stone" magazine in 1974, the ad reflects the stylized starkness often found in movie posters of this time period

Condition/description: This ad is in very good condition with slight age darkening.

Size: 9" x 13" unframed - 16" x 20" in plexiglass frame


$150.00 (price includes shipping)
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Framed Fleetwood Cigarette Advertisement, 1946

In the early to mid 1940s, Philip Morris marketed Fleetwood cigarettes to compete head-to-head with other wildly popular brands of the day including Lucky Strike, Camel and Chesterfield. The company invested heavily in print advertising including this ad, which ran in a 1943 edition of Life Magazine. It depicts a jury of people with "good taste," who sampled blend after blend of tobacco, until just the right flavor was achieved. Although Fleetwoods became standard issue in U.S. Army C-rations, they were never able to compete successfully against other brands.

Nicely illustrated, the ad is kitschy and reflects the muted colors and styles of the day.

Condition/description: This print is in very good condition, with slight age darkening. The edges are crisp and there are no tears. The piece is mounted under plexiglass for protective purposes and can be easily reframed.

Size: 9" x 13" unframed - 16" x 20" in plexiglass frame

 


$150.00 (price includes shipping)
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Framed Gordon's London Dry Gin Advertisement, 1963

This Gordon's London Dry Gin ad was published in a 1963 edition of Life Magazine. Supposedly, the gin's secret recipe is known by only 12 people in the world. It was first produced in 1769 in London by a Scottsman, Alexander Gordon. Hence, the tie-in to Blackstone's "Commentaries on the Laws of England," which was published just four years earlier in 1765. Gordon's is sold in a distinctive green glass bottle in Great Britain. In all other markets it is sold in a clear bottle, as pictured here. The print's rich hues would work well in a paneled library or study.

Condition/description: This print is in very good condition, with slight age darkening. The edges are crisp and there are no tears. The piece is mounted under plexiglass for protective purposes and can be easily reframed.

Size: 9" x 13" unframed - 16" x 20" in plexiglass frame


$150.00 (price includes shipping)
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Framed "Inherit the Wind" Movie Poster, 1960

Directed by the legendary Stanley Kramer, "Inherit the Wind" is based on the real-life story of two attorneys during the mid 1920s, arguing for and against a science teacher accused of the "crime" of teaching Darwin's Theory. Its tagline, "It's all about the monkey trial that rocked America," describes the famous scopes monkey trial on which the movie was based. The film depicts courtroom debates between real-life attorneys Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryon, who are quoted almost verbatim from the transcripts of the trial. Written first as a play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee, the film was brilliantly cast with a star-studded lineup of Hollywood's best and brightest including: Spencer Tracy, Frederic March, Gene Kelly and Dick York.

Condition/description: This poster is in very good condition. Plexiglass mounted in a handsome black wooden frame, it is a colorful accent piece for an office, a den or a waiting room.

Size: 43 " x 62 "



$1,750.00 (price includes shipping)
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Framed Smirnoff Vodka Advertisement, 1982

This Smirnoff Vodka ad, which was published in a 1982 edition of Sports Illustrated, epitomizes the very essence of F. Lee Bailey's cocky disposition right down to his cowboy boots. The defense attorney for a parade of high-profile clients including Samuel Sheppard, the doctor who was accused of murdering his wife; SLA kidnapping victim and heiress, Patty Hearst; and, of course, O.J. Simpson, he was a master of media manipulation. "Bailey was called by one observer ‘a deep-voiced self-admirer who never met a camera he didn't like.'" He was censured by a Massachusetts judge in 1970 for "his philosophy of extreme egocentricity."
Ironically, no matter how tough he was, alcohol seemed to be one of his weaknesses. The first lines of his 1975 memoir read, "Heavy trials make me thirsty."
The legal puns and clever copy writing make this ad the perfect conversation piece for an office or a bar.

Condition/description: This print is in very good condition, with slight age darkening. The edges are crisp and there are no tears. The piece is mounted under plexiglass for protective purposes and can be easily reframed.

Size: 7 3/4" x 10 3/4" unframed - 16" x 20" in plexiglass frame



$150.00 (price includes shipping)
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